Monthly Archives: March 2014

Donate for the Amarna-Project!

IMG_5317The Amarna-Project is undertaking a very important work! Help them to continue this task!

Great Temple Project

The Great Aten Temple lies beside a rapidly expanding modern village and is under immediate threat of encroachment. The Amarna Trust has now launched a major reclamation project to protect and partly rebuild the temple, a building of unique historical, cultural and spiritual value.

Can you help out?

Your donation through our online fundraising page will be put towards costs of specialist staff, building materials and transport.

No donation is too small – every little bit makes a difference.

Need

The Great Aten Temple lies beside a rapidly expanding modern village and is under immediate threat of encroachment. The temple survives not as a standing monument, but a buried archaeological site. Its invisibility makes it both vulnerable to urban expansion, and difficult for visitors to comprehend. Local authorities work with limited resources and welcome support from international colleagues.

Solution

Working in association with the Ministry of State for Antiquities, the Amarna Trust will embark on an annual campaign to expose, record and redefine the Temple. This project will turn the Great Aten Temple from a hidden ruin into a visible monument with defined boundaries that will help prevent further threa

https://secure.thebiggive.org.uk/projects/view/17049

Objects Archive

Since excavations recommenced at Amarna in 1979, around 24,000 artefacts have been recovered from the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, recorded on paper registration cards. The time is overdue to digitise this archive, making it more searchable, and ensuring that we have a back-up copy. The goal is that the entire database will be made available online for all to use and explore.

Can you help?

Your donation will be used to help cover the costs of transportation and accommodation for volunteers as they undertake the data entry in October 2013.

Since excavations recommenced at Amarna in 1979, around 24,000 artefacts have been recovered from the city of Akhenaten and Nefertiti. This collection of jewellery, statue fragments, stone furniture, and a vast range of other finds, forms one of the most important assemblages of artefacts from ancient Egypt.

At present, the objects are documented on paper registration cards. The time is long overdue to digitise this archive, making it more searchable, and ensuring that we have a back-up copy. The ultimate goal is that the entire database will be made available online for all to use and explore.

In 2012, a group of volunteers travelled to Amarna to begin the task of entering the object cards into a database, and in October 2013 we aim to complete this work.

Can you help?

Your donation will be used to help cover the costs of transportation and accommodation for volunteers as they undertake the data entry.

No donation is too small – every little bit makes a difference.

Thank you for your interest in our work.

– The Amarna Project Team.

PS. Donating through JustGiving is simple, fast and totally secure. Your details are safe with JustGiving – they’ll never sell them on or send unwanted emails. Once you donate, they’ll send your money directly to the Amarna Trust.

http://www.justgiving.com/Amarna-Archiving

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Porter&Moss online

The famous and monumental Porter & Moss!

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March 15, 2014 · 2:04 pm

Sinuhe, deutsch II

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March 13, 2014 · 12:47 pm

Sinuhe, deutsche Version, Teil I

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March 13, 2014 · 12:47 pm

Sinuhe el Egipcio

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March 13, 2014 · 12:42 pm

Ancient Egyptian Weapons

please ignore the discussion below the video

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March 12, 2014 · 9:36 pm

Akhenaten once again

Another scene from the famous opera

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March 11, 2014 · 9:13 pm

Theme week – topic of your choice

Hi! Welcome to all readers of our blog. This week we start a new project: You want to know something about a specific topic? We are going to discuss your choice, give literature hints, photos.. all you need! So – let´s start and tell us what topic you like!!Image

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Object biography #15: A previously unidentified statue of Senenmut (Acc. no. 4624)

Egypt at the Manchester Museum

Front_blogJPEG Acc. no. 4624. Photos copyright Manchester Museum

Our fragment (Acc. no. 4624) came to the Manchester Museum from the excavations of Edouard Naville at the site of Deir el-Bahri between 1894 and 1907. A more precise provenance for the piece or when exactly it entered the collection is not known. The fragment is 48.5cm high and 31cm wide, made of indurated limestone, and depicts the lower portion of a seated figure at about half lifesize. It is badly damaged but still carries hieroglyphic text on the sides of the seat, base and over the knees. Interestingly, the seat retains an artisan’s red ink guidelines for the inscription. Traces remain of blue pigment within individual hieroglyphic signs, implying that the statue was not, however, left unfinished.

Left_blogJPEGThe identity of the individual represented is recorded in our catalogue – based on hieroglyphs on the base – as ‘the priest of Amun, Userhat’…

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Call for papers

Roberta Mazza

Mrs Rylands on a trip to Egypt (Courtesy of the John Rylands Library) Mrs Enriqueta Rylands, founder of the John Rylands Library, on a trip to Egypt (ca. 1907-1908)
(© The John Rylands Library)

From Egypt to Manchester: unravelling the John Rylands papyrus collection.
This conference aims to bring together scholars who are working or have recently worked on the John Rylands papyri. We welcome papers from any period and perspective based on papyri from our collection in any of the languages and scripts attested from the Ptolemaic to the early Arab period.
Topics are open, and may include, but are not confined to: edition and commentary of texts, historical studies based on the Rylands papyri, connections with other collections, history of the collection, and archives and dossiers of individuals and institutions held or partially held in Manchester.
We are particularly interested in papers offering new insights on the papyri considered and at the same time dealing with methodological questions related to the…

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